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Goal 3 | What You Eat: It Matters | 1 of 10
Link Between Nutrition and Diabetes
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You get type 2 diabetes by consuming excessive amounts of junk food over a lifetime. True or false?

The correct answer is false.

Eating excessive amounts of junk food doesn't cause type 2 diabetes, although a healthy diet and getting plenty of exercise can help prevent it.

Diabetes can occur in anyone. Some risk factors for diabetes include family history, obesity, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, and lack of physical activity.

video

Hidden sugar in everyday foods

(4.2 grams = 1 teaspoon)
1 sugarcube = approx. 4 grams sugar cube



Type of Food Measurement Grams of Sugar
Pasta sauces, tomato-based 1/2 cup 15 g sugar cubesugar cubesugar cubesugar cube
BBQ sauce 2 Tbsp. 12 gsugar cubesugar cubesugar cube
Fat-free salad dressing 2 Tbsp. 8 gsugar cubesugar cube
Flavored yogurt 1 serving 16-28 gsugar cubesugar cubesugar cubesugar cubesugar cubesugar cube
Multigrain cereal 1 cup 6 gsugar cube
Multigrain crackers 1 serving 4 gsugar cube
Snack bars 1 bar 24 gsugar cubesugar cubesugar cubesugar cube
Smoothies 1 single-serving bottle up to 38 gsugar cubesugar cubesugar cubesugar cubesugar cubesugar cubesugar cubesugar cube


You should also read food labels carefully and look at the recommended serving size and servings per container. You might be surprised to learn that you're consuming more than one serving.

nutrition label

Click to download pdf!

Diabetes is a disease in which levels of glucose (aka sugar) in the blood are higher than normal. Your body produces glucose from the foods you eat—mainly carbohydrates. When you consume carbohydrates, your glucose levels go up. Keeping track of how many carbohydrates you eat can help you keep your blood glucose levels in your target range.

Carbohydrates (carbs) are the starches, sugars, and fiber in your diet:

  • Breads
  • Pasta
  • Cereals
  • Potatoes
  • Beans
  • Peas
  • Lentils

Natural sugars ("good" sugars) are in fruits, milk, and vegetables. Desserts, sweetened beverages, and candy contain added ("bad") sugars.

Fiber is in all plant foods:

  • Vegetables
  • Fruits
  • Grains
  • Beans

Managing your diabetes depends on controlling the amount of glucose in your bloodstream. Eating the same amount of carbs each day can help blood glucose levels stay on target. The goal is to keep glucose levels as close to normal as possible.

If you take insulin, sometimes the amount of insulin you need is based on the amount of carbs in a meal.

Recommended blood glucose levels before and after meals
Before a meal 70–130 mg/dl (5.0–7.2 mmol/l)
After a meal Less than 180 mg/dl (less than 10.0 mmol/l)
junk food Diabetes In Minority Groups

Correct!

Diabetes can occur in anyone. Some risk factors for diabetes include family history, obesity, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, and lack of physical inactivity.

According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), African Americans, Hispanic/Latino Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans, and Pacific Islander Americans are at a higher risk for type 2 diabetes than the rest of the population.

Junk food is not just donuts and potato chips…you may not realize there are hidden sugars (added sugars, that do not occur naturally) in foods you eat almost every day.

video

You should also read food labels carefully and look at the recommended serving size and servings per container. You might be surprised to learn that you're consuming more than one serving.

nutrition label

Click to download pdf!

Diabetes is a disease in which levels of glucose (aka sugar) in the blood are higher than normal. Your body produces glucose from the foods you eat—mainly carbohydrates. When you consume carbohydrates, your glucose levels go up. Keeping track of how many carbohydrates you eat can help you keep your blood glucose levels in your target range.

Carbohydrates (carbs) are the starches, sugars, and fiber in your diet:

  • Breads
  • Pasta
  • Cereals
  • Potatoes
  • Beans
  • Peas
  • Lentils

Natural sugars ("good" sugars) are in fruits, milk, and vegetables. Desserts, sweetened beverages, and candy contain added ("bad") sugars.

Fiber is in all plant foods:

  • Vegetables
  • Fruits
  • Grains
  • Beans

Managing your diabetes depends on controlling the amount of glucose in your bloodstream. Eating the same amount of carbs each day can help blood glucose levels stay on target. The goal is to keep glucose levels as close to normal as possible.

If you take insulin, sometimes the amount of insulin you need is based on the amount of carbs in a meal.

Recommended blood glucose levels before and after meals
Before a meal 70–130 mg/dl (5.0–7.2 mmol/l)
After a meal Less than 180 mg/dl (less than 10.0 mmol/l)
junk food Diabetes In Minority Groups