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Goal 1 | Taking Control | 1 of 6
Addressing Stereotypes & Judgments
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Do you feel that being diagnosed with or being at risk for type 2 diabetes is your fault?

Yes, I feel somehow this is my fault

Many people feel guilt, shame, or embarrassment about being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes because they may think that they caused it.

Type 2 diabetes can be the result of several factors, including family history, or genetics. In some ways, though, it is true that certain factors that put a person at risk for type 2 diabetes are in fact under their own control.

A simple blood test can tell you if you have diabetes or if you are at risk for developing diabetes, in a condition stage called prediabetes.

To avoid feeling guilt, shame, or embarrassment, educating yourself about your condition can be a big help. And even more, it's important to know that you're not alone and that there are many easy-to-access resources that are available to help you cope with your diagnosis. Here's just one example:

Click to compare normal glucose transport vs. type 2 diabetes insulin resistance.

What is insulin? Insulin is a natural hormone that your body produces in your pancreas and it is used to control the amount of glucose (aka sugar) in your blood. Insulin carries sugar out from your blood and into the cells of your body—making sure that the amount of sugar in your blood is in a healthy range for your body to function properly. In type 2 diabetes, your body is unable to produce enough and use insulin properly, so it cannot carry sugar into your cells, where it is used for energy. Although your body makes some insulin, it's not enough to overcome this resistance.

Generally speaking, the most important thing to understand about type 2 diabetes is that it results in high blood glucose, and high blood glucose can cause other problems within the body.

patient

Type 2 diabetes is caused by a combination of unhealthy lifestyle habits and genetics.

Lifestyle habits such as eating and physical activity have a major influence on how a person's body operates, and for those already at risk due to genetics, they may have to work harder to maintain good health.

You can be more likely to develop diabetes if:

  • you're overweight
  • you have a family history of diabetes
  • you have a history of diabetes during pregnancy
  • you're over age 45
  • you're African-American or Hispanic

The Good News

The good news about being diagnosed with diabetes is it can be a wake-up call to make lifestyle changes, and with proper management, you can live a long, active, happy, healthy lifestyle despite diabetes. It's important to know that what you do does make a difference, and diabetes and related complications are not inevitable.

Being embarrassed about having diabetes may come from believing in some common myths. You may have heard some of these, but they are not true for everyone.

Click on the myths below and see if it's true or false!

"I ate too much sugar, and that's how I got diabetes."
"Diabetes means I could have to have my foot cut off."
"Having diabetes means I'll lose my eyesight."
"I have diabetes because I'm overweight."

No, I don't feel that I'm at fault.

You're on your way! Type 2 diabetes is the result of a number of factors, including your family history. It's manageable, and you can lead a healthy, active life! As you continue through this course, you will find many resources and tools available to help!

Click to compare normal glucose transport vs. type 2 diabetes insulin resistance.

What is insulin? Insulin is a natural hormone that your body produces in your pancreas and it is used to control the amount of glucose (aka sugar) in your blood. Insulin carries sugar out from your blood and into the cells of your body—making sure that the amount of sugar in your blood is in a healthy range for your body to function properly. In type 2 diabetes, your body is unable to produce enough and use insulin properly, so it cannot carry sugar into your cells, where it is used for energy. Although your body makes some insulin, it's not enough to overcome this resistance.

Generally speaking, the most important thing to understand about type 2 diabetes is that it results in high blood glucose, and high blood glucose can cause other problems within the body.

patient

The Good News

The good news about being diagnosed with diabetes is it can be a wake-up call to make lifestyle changes, and with proper management, you can live a long, active, happy, healthy lifestyle despite diabetes. It's important to know that what you do does make a difference, and diabetes and related complications are not inevitable.

Being embarrassed about having diabetes may come from believing in some common myths. You may have heard some of these, but they are not true for everyone.

Click on the myths below and see if it's true or false!

"I ate too much sugar, and that's how I got diabetes."
"Diabetes means I could have to have my foot cut off."
"Having diabetes means I'll lose my eyesight."
"I have diabetes because I'm overweight."